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Literacy

What the Ladybird Heard

This week, the literacy tasks are all based around the book What the Ladybird Heard. Like last week, your child does NOT have to complete all of these tasks, please feel free to pick and choose tasks throughout the week, or work through them all if you would like. The 5 tasks focus on thinking about and describing the animals in the story and thinking about the map and plan that the thieves create to try and sneak around the farm. The tasks involve some writing, drawing and imaginary play. There are also two other activities based on the story, one focussing on rhyming words and the other on listening.

As with last week, there is a video introducing each of these learning tasks as well as a video where I read the story for children to listen to (you can of course read the book yourselves if you happen to have the book at home).  All of the video links can be found on this page. (Videos will be linked Monday morning).

Click here to view the story read by Miss Gilbody.

Click here to view the story 'What the Ladybird Heard Next' read by Miss Gilbody

Click here to view the introduction for What the Ladybird Heard task 1.

Click here to view the introduction for What the Ladybird Heard task 2.

Click here to view the introduction for What the Ladybird Heard task 3.

Click here to view the introduction for What the Ladybird Heard task 4.

Click here to view the introduction for What the Ladybird Heard task 5.

Click here to view the introduction to the Ladybird listening activity.

Click here to view the introduction to the Ladybird rhyming activities.

Please find a few resources below that your child may find useful this week.

  • Ladybird pencil control - these sheets can be used form your child to practise their pencil control.
  • Stick puppets - you could print and cut these out (or draw some of your own!) and your child could use them to verbally retell the story (or to create their own farmyard puppet show).
  • Ladybird writing sheets - we often use sheets like these in class to help encourage children to have a go at writing. Your child could use these sheets to have a go at writing a few words linked to the story (animal names for example) or to write a sentence about something that happened in the book.
  • Word mat - your child could use this mat to support with some writing. Although we always encourage children to sound words out and write the sounds that they can hear, we often have a few words linking to a topic or story on mats like this or stuck up in the classroom to support with writing. Your child could use this mat to copy words from the story for some writing practise or to support with writing a sentence.

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